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Burning Godzilla
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Greatly enjoying Winged Obsession, about the years-long undercover operation that led to the capture of the world's greatest smuggler of rare and endangered insects.

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Tue Jan 10, 2017 11:49 pm
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Burning Godzilla
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About to start The Best of Connie Willis: Award-Winning Stories (2013), a collection which assemblies all her stories which have won the Hugo, the Nebula, or both, from 1982 to 2007.

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Dark tears for is alabaster muse lost forever into the unforgiving jade daggers of the night. Her slim form no longer to touch his burning lips, her blood like the thorny rose no longer his, O Death! O Oblivion! Why havent you come! I wait in my garden of shadows for thee! -- Juniper releases her inner Goth.


Wed Jan 11, 2017 7:00 pm
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Burning Godzilla
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Location: Tyrannia (NOTE: This is a lie.)
My plan for 2017 is this: For every book I read written by a white male, I read one that is written by someone who is not a white male. So far it's Mary Roach's Grunt, a witty popular-science text about the various projects in development to make life easier for soldiers in various ways (among other things: keeping IED shockwaves from injuring or killing tank crew members; the development of escape devices for submarines; the use of forensic pathology to make better medical devices based on finding out what didn't keep soldiers alive in the field).

Very interesting, although it's covering a hell of a lot of ground and doesn't get all that detailed from time to time.

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Checkpoint Telstar goes to B Fest 2017, and the second half of the travelogue (the one that's actually got the movies in it) has now gone live.


Wed Jan 11, 2017 9:53 pm
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Burning Godzilla
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TelstarMan wrote:
My plan for 2017 is this: For every book I read written by a white male, I read one that is written by someone who is not a white male.


You have to make a conscious decision to do that? I always had you pegged as sort of a reading omnivore.

Here are some suggestions to help: Toni Morrison: Song of Solomon or Beloved.
James Baldwin's works.
THE DEFENDER: How the Legendary Black Newspaper Changed America From the Age of the Pullman Porters to the Age of Obama.
DARK MONEY: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right. By Jane Mayer.
Orhan Pamuk (Turkish) - A Strangeness in My Mind or Snow.
Salman Rushdie - Shalimar the Clown, Shame, Luka and the Fire of Life.
Margaret Atwood: The Blind Assassin, The Oryx and Crake trilogy

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Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:40 pm
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Burning Godzilla
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Location: Tyrannia (NOTE: This is a lie.)
Bergerjacques wrote:
TelstarMan wrote:
My plan for 2017 is this: For every book I read written by a white male, I read one that is written by someone who is not a white male.


You have to make a conscious decision to do that? I always had you pegged as sort of a reading omnivore.

Well, I am, but I'm trying to make a concerted effort for diversity this time around. Especially because I read a lot of science fiction, and that's a genre where white dudes are pretty seriously overrepresented.

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Checkpoint Telstar goes to B Fest 2017, and the second half of the travelogue (the one that's actually got the movies in it) has now gone live.


Thu Jan 12, 2017 9:04 pm
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Burning Godzilla
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TelstarMan wrote:
Bergerjacques wrote:
TelstarMan wrote:
My plan for 2017 is this: For every book I read written by a white male, I read one that is written by someone who is not a white male.


You have to make a conscious decision to do that? I always had you pegged as sort of a reading omnivore.

Well, I am, but I'm trying to make a concerted effort for diversity this time around. Especially because I read a lot of science fiction, and that's a genre where white dudes are pretty seriously overrepresented.


So you're going to break down and read you some Anne McCaffrey and Tanith Lee?
I do suggest Tana French. She's female and Irish.
I won't suggest LeGuin, because I know you've read some of her work.

(I will admit to this. At the very second I write this, I just learned that esteemed popular science fiction novelist Andre Norton is female. Never read her work, but have seen plenty of novels she has written. Buit for nearly all of my 51 years - thought she was a dude.)

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Thu Jan 12, 2017 9:20 pm
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Burning Godzilla
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Victoria Silverwolf wrote:
About to start The Best of Connie Willis: Award-Winning Stories (2013), a collection which assemblies all her stories which have won the Hugo, the Nebula, or both, from 1982 to 2007.


The BEST of Connie Willis? I would expect that collection to kick tail.

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Sat Jan 14, 2017 7:10 pm
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Reading The Marvelous Land of Oz featuring Tip, Mombi, and Jack Pumpkinhead (so far) and it has been a much more interesting affair than The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Baum must have known that he had the attention of adults as well as kids with his first book. The narrative voice seems to address older readers.

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Tue Jan 17, 2017 4:20 pm
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Burning Godzilla
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The Oz books do get more interesting as they go on. (At least the ones by Baum. I haven't read the others.) In direct opposition to the "there's no place like home" theme of the 1939 film, everybody in Dorothy's family eventually decides to move to Oz.

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Dark tears for is alabaster muse lost forever into the unforgiving jade daggers of the night. Her slim form no longer to touch his burning lips, her blood like the thorny rose no longer his, O Death! O Oblivion! Why havent you come! I wait in my garden of shadows for thee! -- Juniper releases her inner Goth.


Tue Jan 17, 2017 7:26 pm
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Bergerjacques wrote:
Reading The Marvelous Land of Oz featuring Tip, Mombi, and Jack Pumpkinhead (so far) and it has been a much more interesting affair than The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Baum must have known that he had the attention of adults as well as kids with his first book. The narrative voice seems to address older readers.


Let us know when you get to the "translator" scene. That's my favorite moment in the book.

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Tue Jan 17, 2017 7:35 pm
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Lucíola by José de Alencar. The author is one of the foremost proponents of Brazilian Romanticism and best known for his stories about Indians/Native Brazilians, but he also wrote a number of heavy-handed romances set among the noble circles of Rio de Janeiro. The plays like a predecessor of Pretty Woman: a naïve young man from northeastern Brazil, Paulo, comes to Rio de Janeiro to make his fortune and at a party, falls head over heels for a cynical, worldly courtesan named Lúcia. After sharing a night together at a Bacchian party thrown by a friend—yes, alcohol was involved—the two start up a friendship/relationship and the man discovers that beneath the rough exterior is a sensitive, even pious person. But the two have to overcome their own prejudices and societal expectations for him to bring out the best in her.

I found the story enjoyable, but the bittersweet ending was far too rushed to have a lot of impact. By the last three chapters, both characters overcome their individual inner demons and are together, although Lúcia refuses to marry him (probably because society would shun Paulo and ruin him professionally if it discovered he was married to a former prostitute). Then, in the last five pages, we learn that the aforementioned tryst had resulted in Lúcia getting pregnant, and that she’s about to lose the baby. She ends up dying of complications caused by the mid-term miscarriage. Before she died, Lúcia tried to convince Paulo to marry her 12-year-old sister, Ana (assuming that he’d wait a few years before keeping the promise in its fullness), so that he could continue loving Lúcia vicariously through the sister, who sort of looked like her. Paulo prefers to be Ana’s father figure, and we learn that Paulo has stayed celibate and doesn’t plan to marry because he never forgets his love for Lúcia…d’awwwww.

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Wed Jan 18, 2017 1:59 pm
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Burning Godzilla
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Greatly enjoyed Three Sisters In Black by Norman Zierold and currently devouring the wonderfully eerie The Homing by Jeff Campbell.

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Guy in bar: "I got 50 dollars in my pocket saying you're coming home with me tonight."
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Sample piscatorial love at Cliffie's Notes! Now in blog form for the greater good of the Fish Conspiracy!


Sun Jan 22, 2017 9:05 pm
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Bergerjacques wrote:
Reading The Marvelous Land of Oz featuring Tip, Mombi, and Jack Pumpkinhead (so far) and it has been a much more interesting affair than The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Baum must have known that he had the attention of adults as well as kids with his first book. The narrative voice seems to address older readers.

You know how certain people have this notion that _Wonderful Wizard_ is this political allegory about the Gold Standard and populism and such? Clearly he felt like he had a good thing going telling stories about magic land, so I've always doubted that one. But I guess it's up to the reader whether _The Land Of Oz_ has anything serious to say in its mockery of theories of parenting, intellectuals, feminism, disarmament, the military in general, royalty, and, well, pretty much everyone and everything. The alternative argument would be that Baum was just having fun.

Never read any of the later ones after the second, but always kinda meant to.


Tue Jan 24, 2017 11:24 pm
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I would say that Baum throws in bits of relatively gentle satire now and then among the whimsy.

About to start Not of Woman Born (1999) edited by Constance Ash, a collection of original science fiction stories on theme of alternate methods of human reproduction. (There's also one reprint, a 1957 story by Robert Silverberg.)

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Dark tears for is alabaster muse lost forever into the unforgiving jade daggers of the night. Her slim form no longer to touch his burning lips, her blood like the thorny rose no longer his, O Death! O Oblivion! Why havent you come! I wait in my garden of shadows for thee! -- Juniper releases her inner Goth.


Wed Jan 25, 2017 8:35 pm
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I have started Time Out of Mind by Pierre Boulle, a collection of stories translated from the French by the famous author of Planet of the Apes and The Bridge Over the River Kwai.

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Dark tears for is alabaster muse lost forever into the unforgiving jade daggers of the night. Her slim form no longer to touch his burning lips, her blood like the thorny rose no longer his, O Death! O Oblivion! Why havent you come! I wait in my garden of shadows for thee! -- Juniper releases her inner Goth.


Sat Jan 28, 2017 2:01 am
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