Reply to topic  [ 46 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
H-Man's Countdown to 200 Japanese Movies 
Author Message
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2001 2:48 am
Posts: 4997
Location: Brighton, MI
I read through that 3x looking for Matango! 'Twould have been easier if the list were alphabetical, but that's mu problem, not yours.

Now what about Tampopo? It is one of the finest films I have ever watched on any subject, and needless to say it came out of Toho Studios.

_________________
Guy in bar: "I got 50 dollars in my pocket saying you're coming home with me tonight."
Girl in bar: "They're lying to you."
(from Psychos In Love)

Sample piscatorial love at Cliffie's Notes! Now in blog form for the greater good of the Fish Conspiracy!


Mon Apr 03, 2017 6:13 pm
Profile WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Cliffie wrote:
I read through that 3x looking for Matango! 'Twould have been easier if the list were alphabetical, but that's mu problem, not yours.

Now what about Tampopo? It is one of the finest films I have ever watched on any subject, and needless to say it came out of Toho Studios.


I haven't seen it out on DVD over here, but I'll check again. I should watch that one, A Taxing Woman, and Minbo: The Gentle Art of Japanese Extortion (which got the filmmaker in hot water with the Yazkua).

_________________
I wrote a book!


Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:20 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
#148 - The Human Vapor (1960) - (original title: Gasu ningen dai 1 gô) - Produced by Toho Studios. This is the last movie in Special FX maestro Eiji Tsuburaya's so-called "mutant series" that I hadn't seen. The other three are Secret of Telegian, Matango and H-Man, which are pretty good movies, especially the later. All these movies explore the effects of modern Science on people themselves. Steven Scheuer, his Movies on TV and Videocassette, dimissed this film as a low-rent Invisible Man clone. That's not entirely fair, although it's probably my least favorite of the mutant films.

I know there are some structural differences between the Japanese and American versions of this movie, and I saw the American dub. The bulk of the story is told in flashback, as a former test pilot-turned-librarian named Mizuno (Toho sci-fi film regular Yoshio Tsuchiya) is telling some reporters his story. We learn that he had aspired to become an astronaut, but due to some "shadows on an X-ray", was committed to a sanitarium for some time, which ultimately killed his career. One day he's approached by a scientist from the Japanese aerospace commission who wants to perform some experiments on him that may allow him to pursue his dream once more. The experiment gives him the power to transform his body into a gaseous state and go anywhere it likes (sort of similar to The 4-D Man, but without the aging bit). He immediately descends into megalomania, with the Nietzschean notion that the laws of mortals no longer apply to him, because he has ascended above all. He begins robbing banks in order to finance the comeback of a dancer, Fujichiya (Kaoru Yashigusa), whom he fell in love with while she was spending time in the sanitarium herself--I wish the film was more explicit as to why both of them would have to go to the booby hatch, but alas, we never find out (in this version). While he stand in no danger of being caught...or incarcerated, when Fujichiya starts spending the stolen Money, it'll for sure attract the attention of dedicated detective Okumura (Tatsuya Mihashi, High and Low) and his feisty repórter girlfriend, Kyoko (Keika Sata).

The special FX sequences are sporadic, brief and considerably lower on ambition than Tsuburaya's kaiju eiga and space operas. Most of the FX are optical effects of Mizuno transforming into mist and occasionally a vapor surrounding someone, thus asphyxiating him. They're fine, as far as it goes, but people expecting another Tsuburaya extravaganza will be let down by the smaller scale. Thus, the film becomes more dependent on its characters than on the FX scenes themselves. That's where the dubbing lets this film down, especially in the glacially-paced first act. While a number of Asian actors provide the characters with accents that help things feel authentic, the fact that the story is told in flashback means that we often have to sit through minutes of top-heavy narration from Mizuno at a time, instead of hearing what the characters have to say to each other. This becomes less of a problem as the film goes on, but I honestly considered turning the film off by the 32-minute mark. Once the story picks up the pace as the police close in on Fujichiya, whom they think is behind the robberies, then the story becomes a lot more compelling. I can't quite recommend this the English language version, but I won't write the film off entirely. On the same token, I'm not sure that I'll be in a huge hurry to check out the original Japanese cut, either.

_________________
I wrote a book!


Tue Apr 04, 2017 4:27 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2001 2:48 am
Posts: 4997
Location: Brighton, MI
Hman wrote:
Cliffie wrote:
I read through that 3x looking for Matango! 'Twould have been easier if the list were alphabetical, but that's mu problem, not yours.

Now what about Tampopo? It is one of the finest films I have ever watched on any subject, and needless to say it came out of Toho Studios.


I haven't seen it out on DVD over here, but I'll check again. I should watch that one, A Taxing Woman, and Minbo: The Gentle Art of Japanese Extortion (which got the filmmaker in hot water with the Yazkua).


Just be ready with something to "cleanse the palate" after watching A Taxing Woman. It's a fine film, but that penetrating soundtrack is almost impossible to get out of your head afterwards.

_________________
Guy in bar: "I got 50 dollars in my pocket saying you're coming home with me tonight."
Girl in bar: "They're lying to you."
(from Psychos In Love)

Sample piscatorial love at Cliffie's Notes! Now in blog form for the greater good of the Fish Conspiracy!


Wed Apr 05, 2017 5:48 pm
Profile WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
#149 - House (1977) - (original title: Hausu) - Produced by Toho studios. The set-up is pretty simple. Seven teenage girls (named Gorgeous, Fantasy, Kung Fu, Mac, Sweet, Melody, and Prof) go to the former's aunt house to spend their summer vacation from school, after summer camp with their male teacher (whom Fantasy obviously wants to nail) falls through. The aunt has been a bit of a recluse ever since her fiancé, a fighter pilot, was killed in WW2 decades before. At the woman's mansion, strange things begin to occur and the girls start disappearing one by one, dying if the most surreal ways possible. We learn that the aunt is something of a cannibal, but that the house itself is impregnated with her spirit and so the people-chomping occurs in wackadoo and offbeat ways, like a person getting eaten alive by a piano!


I think a lot of movies, especially horror movies, have a certain bag of tricks about it. After watching it once, all those tricks are used up and there's no reason to go back and watch it again. That isn't the case here. The film's refusal to play by the rules of other haunted house movies, its bizarre visuals that rival the best moments of Dario Argento, and its cryptic denouement invite repeated viewings, both to admire the beauty of the film and to try to figure out just what the hell you just saw. Yes, the optical FX might've looked fine in an Eiji Tsuburaya film made 20 years before, but that just adds to the whole "What if Salvador Dali and René Magrite made a haunted house movie?" vibe. But beyond those, there are some wonderful photographic compositions, such as a shot of the main character, Gorgeous, through the glass panes of a door. In certain panes, the character/shot is completely frozen, while in others, she's moving and doing stuff.


I still haven't made complete sense of the movie, and I plan on watching it again to try to figure it out, but I have a theory about the last 15 minutes or so that draws a parallel to the whole Harry Potter horcrux subplot that Works its way into the last two books. I'll save that discussion for people who have already seen it.

_________________
I wrote a book!


Mon Apr 10, 2017 3:45 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
#150 – Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance (1972) – (original title: Kozure Ôkami: Ko wo kashi ude kashi tsukamatsuru) – Produced by Toho Studios. I have already seen Shogun Assassin, which was the first two films of the series edited into one slam-bang feature, and Lupine Wolf/Lightning Swords of Death, which was the third movie of the series, but I had never really seen the original Lone Wolf and Cub series from start to finish. It’s time to change that. I can think of no better film to celebrate my 150th Japanese movie than this one…well, maybe Tampopo, but that’s neither here nor there.

So Itto Ogami is the Shogun’s official executioner, in charge of killing rebellious daimyos and samurai. This position puts the entire Ogami family among the elite of the Shogun’s court. However, there’s a branch of the Yagyu clan, led by the old and creepy Retsudo Yagyu, who serve as the Shogun’s personal assassins and aspire to the honors that Ogami and his clan enjoy. So one day, a trio of Yagyu ninja murder Itto’s wife and leave a memorial plaque bearing the Shogun’s insignia inside a temple on Ogami’s property where he prays for the souls of those he has executed. In other words, they frame him for treason and sedition. So Itto slaughters not one, but two contingents of samurai sent to arrest/execute/force Ogami to commit sepukku, and goes on the lam with his son. He supports himself by hiring out his skills as an assassin, while simultaneously trying to track down the remaining members of Retsudo’s family line and kill them.

The story bounces back between the backstory above and Ogami’s first mission, which is to slay a corrupt prefect and the assassins he contracted to ambush a daimyo from a distant district. Ogami and his son, Daigoro, find the villains at a small village known for its thermal baths. The two bide their time until the assassins are about to leave the village to put their ambush in effect, at which point Ogami springs into action and slays every last one of the brigands. End of story.

A lot of reviews I’ve read comment that the film is slow and one would best go into it expecting no action at all. I don’t find that entirely true, especially after some of the early 60s jidai-geki movies I’ve seen. There are three major set pieces, with the best being saved for last. Watching Ogami transform parts of his son’s wooden pram into a naginata and hack a dozen men to pieces was just what the doctor ordered. Much like the film Kill Bill, a human being during the Tokugawa Shogunate had about 10 gallons of blood under intense pressure flowing in his/her veins, in such a way that being cut would release a geyser of it into the air. The effect is blackly funny, but using it as a compliment to well-staged action scenes inside of a well-directed film, the exaggeration works more than it does in, say, Machine Girl.

Just a funny observation: My wife is a lot more conservative than I am, especially when it comes to content in movies. So imagine my dismay when she sits down to watch the movie with me, just in time for a random rape scene, followed later by another sequence in which Ogami is more or less forced to have sex with a prostitute in front of a bunch of people. She gave me “the look” which translated into “why are you watching this?” I lied and said, “I’m here for the sword fights. I didn’t know there’d be any of this in the film” and followed that up with, “I was also curious because this is one of the films that inspired Kill Bill.” She didn’t stay for the end, but thankfully didn’t argue with me after the film was over. I can only imagine what I’ll have to say to her when it comes time to watch Part 4.

_________________
I wrote a book!


Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:53 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2001 6:41 pm
Posts: 9439
Location: Carlisle, Kentucky
Hman wrote:
#150 – Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance (1972) – (original title: Kozure Ôkami: Ko wo kashi ude kashi tsukamatsuru) – Produced by Toho Studios.
Just a funny observation: My wife is a lot more conservative than I am, especially when it comes to content in movies. So imagine my dismay when she sits down to watch the movie with me, just in time for a random rape scene, followed later by another sequence in which Ogami is more or less forced to have sex with a prostitute in front of a bunch of people. She gave me “the look” which translated into “why are you watching this?” I lied and said, “I’m here for the sword fights. I didn’t know there’d be any of this in the film” and followed that up with, “I was also curious because this is one of the films that inspired Kill Bill.” She didn’t stay for the end, but thankfully didn’t argue with me after the film was over. I can only imagine what I’ll have to say to her when it comes time to watch Part 4.


I was hoping, while reading about your dilemma, that Ogami's act of humility and unselfishness might have mitigated your wife's objections. But it is tough stuff. And, unfortunately, it won't be the only instance in the series. The only thing I can say is that its never portrayed as anything but horrendous and the perpetrators as scum worthy of violent death. Later in the series, a female assassin mistakes some rough handling from Itto as a possible assault until she realizes he is doing something for all three of their survival. I will engage in no other spoilers as this is an outstanding series throughout its entire run and you should enjoy it without expectations.

Regarding Shogun Assassin, the movie comes as an extra to the Criterion Collection series. I hadn't seen it ever until about a month ago. It is fascinating how the editors of that version skillfully turn Retsudo Yagyu from the devious head of a rival clan into the power mad emperor gone insane.

_________________
Oh yeah, down here, I am considered the apotheosis of cool - Sewer Urchin

This is an appalling film. And for some of you, well worth your time - SSM

I like the way this board thinks


Thu Apr 20, 2017 4:46 pm
Profile WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
It is interesting how they did it, although the guy playing Retsudo looks extremely creepy and spends most of the first movie mumbling in an even creepier monotone, so changing into an insane, power-made emperor was only a question of tweaking the dubbed script and narration. The actor sold the rest.

The scene of Itto using body heat to avoid hypothermia after falling into the river was in Shogun Assassin, so don’t worry about spoilers.

I think if she had only seen the nudity involved with breast feeding early on, she probably wouldn’t have cared too much.

I have two expectations:

1. Stomp2 once told me in an e-mail (and commented in his old blog review of Kill Bill vol. 1) that the finale for part 4 was one of the best martial arts sequences ever filmed.

2. Also, Leonard Maltin named the finale for part 6 as one of the best fight sequences in world cinema.

_________________
I wrote a book!


Thu Apr 20, 2017 7:16 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2001 6:41 pm
Posts: 9439
Location: Carlisle, Kentucky
Hman wrote:
I have two expectations:

1. Stomp2 once told me in an e-mail (and commented in his old blog review of Kill Bill vol. 1) that the finale for part 4 was one of the best martial arts sequences ever filmed.

2. Also, Leonard Maltin named the finale for part 6 as one of the best fight sequences in world cinema.


You go in with that level of expectation, you will be disappointed. They are good, but nothing ever lives up to such superlatives. Given your depth of experience with martial arts movies, you will have seen martial arts scenes and fight sequences the equal to, or even better than, those in that series.

I had forgotten that the body heat scene came in the second movie.

_________________
Oh yeah, down here, I am considered the apotheosis of cool - Sewer Urchin

This is an appalling film. And for some of you, well worth your time - SSM

I like the way this board thinks


Fri Apr 21, 2017 1:01 pm
Profile WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
#151 - Lone Wolf and Cub: Perambulator at the River Styx (1972) - (original title: Kozure Ôkami: Sanzu no kawa no ubaguruma) - Produced by Toho Studios. Okay, so this one was a lot of fun. So there's a territory run by a rich daimyo where a special dye-making process has been discovered. The process has made the reigning clan far richer than official records would indicate, which has made the Shogunate a bit jealous and greedy. So the powers that be have sent spies to instigate peasant rebellions, and now one of the rebels is on his way to Edo to testify against the daimyo, which would give the Shogun good reason to confiscate the clan's riches. Ogami Itto is contracted to eliminate the rebel and his entourage of bodyguards, the legendar of "Masters of Death" (as they are known in Shogun Assassin), whom even the Yagyu are afraid of.

Much like the first film, the mission itself makes up the last act of the movie. Much of the movie revolves around the Yagyu's repeated attempts to kill Ogami. This time, they contact a branch of the Family that is run by Sayaka Yagyu and her band of sadistic kunoichi. All sorts of traps are laid for Ogami, and he even gets seriously injured at one point, leading to an interesting bit where Daigoro, despite being three or so, tries to help his father. The kid says little, but is smart enough to do things like take food that has been offered to the local kami and leave his own clothing in Exchange, so that his father can eat. It's very adorable. The action is of the same high standard as the previous film, with the finale being a standout. Set on some Sandy dunes, the Masters of Death viciously slaughter an entire army hiding beneath the sand. But then Ogami Itto appears in the distance and they meet their match, leading to one of the most memorable throat-slittings of all time.

_________________
I wrote a book!


Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:33 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
#152 - Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in Peril (1972) - (original title: Kozure Ôkami: Oya no kokoro ko no kokoro) - Produced by Toho studios. Leonard Maltin gave this one the lowest rating in his movie guide, giving it **1/2 out of **** for being slow and "stylistically overblown." I can sort of understand the reason, since some of the voice-overs just pop up for a single scene and then are never heard again. There's also a lot of time spent with flashbacks, which isn't too much of a problem, since we do learn a bit more of Ogami Itto's backstory, plus that of his current contract.

Said contract is a woman named Oyuke, who has been carving up the men of Lord Owari with a short sword (while topless!). Moreover, she has been scalping her victims and sending them back to her former lord. Why? This is where the movie gets into some grey territory--I've noticed that the lines between good and evil in Itto's contracts have been getting more and more blurred with each successive film. You see, Oyuki was a travelling performer of sorts, who was taken in by Lord Owari to be a bodyguard of sorts. One day her trainer knocked her unconscious during a training session, and then decided to strip her naked and rape her. She woke up just in time for the rape, and is more than a little traumatized. So she deserted her post, itself a crime worthy of death. And now she's killing off Owari's men until her trainer is sent to take care of her. While that sounds somewhat justifiable premise for revenge in the context of these period action films, there's a very big "but" to consider.

You see, scalping her victims and sending them back to court is a rather humiliating thing for her to do, especially for the families of those samurai. So humiliating, in fact, that many of them are committing suicide for feeling dishonored at the very ignominous death the men of the house are suffering. That's where Itto comes in. The wife of one of Oyuke's victims hires him to kill her, committing suicide in front of Itto just as the deal is sealed. There are other factors to consider, and the Yagyu clan, which were largely absent from the last film, come back in force for the big clímax. Itto escapes with his life, but only barely.

Just some observations:

- This one has the most nudity of the films so far, although all of it comes from the comely Michi Azuma, who spends more than 75% of her screen time with her breasts exposed.

- I had heard that the finale for this is one of the best of its kind. I think I prefer the battle sequence at the end of the third movie, but this one ended on a high note. Now, the fight at the temple between Itto and the ninja...that was so vicious it was outright feral.

- I liked the episode with Daigoro on his own, although it went on a bit too long.

- While Ogami is just as much a bad-a** as he Always is, he does show a bit more emotion in this film, especially in the final act, than he did in the last one.

_________________
I wrote a book!


Tue Apr 25, 2017 3:39 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2001 6:41 pm
Posts: 9439
Location: Carlisle, Kentucky
I really liked the story as it was told in the Lone Wolf and Cub manga. She uses the tattoo as a way to gain advantage over the samurai. There is also a bit more backstory to make her personal history more damaged by the flaming sword guy that violated her. I'm also a great fan of the Daigoro alone story with the samurai that recognizes the boy must be Itto's son. I thought the movie did all right, but I agree that it doesn't quite scale the heights of the best in the series.

_________________
Oh yeah, down here, I am considered the apotheosis of cool - Sewer Urchin

This is an appalling film. And for some of you, well worth your time - SSM

I like the way this board thinks


Tue Apr 25, 2017 5:40 pm
Profile WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
#153 - Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in the Land of Demons (1973) - (original title: Kozure Ôkami: Meifumadô) - Produced by Toho Studios. This is definitely up there with Baby Cart at the River Styx as one of the best of the series. I found it more satisfying than the last two, even though I liked them. One of the major strengths is that the appearance of the Yagyu clan is integral to Ogami's mission, giving the mission itself a greater sense of urgency than the last movie, where it felt like two separate plots striving for supremacy over the other. In my comments to Baby Cart in Peril, I observed that with each mission, Ogami found himself moving into darker shades of grey with each passing mission. In this film, this is his most morally ambiguous mission yet, and if one were to judge it by modern Occidental morals, it would outright horrifying and villainous. And yet, by the standards of the Tokugawa era, it makes sense that he'd kill the people he does, since the Japanese feudal system goes way beyond the individual. On the action front, the final duel inside the castle is satisfying, probably moreso than the last movie, even though that one had a bigger body count. I think the last movie used up the series' quota of nudity, since this one has none, although it makes up for it in blood geysers. Highly recommended.

_________________
I wrote a book!


Wed Apr 26, 2017 3:55 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2006 1:54 am
Posts: 6598
Location: California's #2 tourist destination
I've got to watch that series properly one of these days. I've only seen the first two, and that was on VHS.

_________________
"This is a Star Trek that pretends to have balls, but continues to prove that those balls are actually rubber prophylactics pretending to be balls." -- Bj

b l e s s e d    a r e    t h e    c h e e s e m a k e r s


Wed Apr 26, 2017 4:29 pm
Profile WWW
Burning Godzilla
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 9:01 pm
Posts: 5185
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
Lone Wolf and Cub: White Heaven in Hell (1974) – (original title: Kozure Okami: Jigoku e ikuzo! Daigorô) – Produced by Toho studios. I was particularly excited about this one, as Leonard Maltin described the finale on the snow-capped mountain as being one of the all-time action sequences in world cinema. Conversely, other reviewers have dismissed said finale as being rather silly. I enjoyed it well enough and it certainly enough scale to it to justify its existence as a capper action sequence to the series. Dozens of ninjas on skis and basket-headed monks on sleds are blown to bits, stabbed, hacked, dismembered, slashed and gored as Ogami makes his way down the mountain. Great stuff all around.

This time, the ongoing feud between Ogami Itto and Retsudo Yagyu is brought back to the forefront, without any side mission to provide Itto with more katana fodder. Much like the third and fifth films, this helps the film move along more smoothly, without making us ask “Just which of these conflicts is the *main* one?” Ogami is making his way to Edo, where he plans on offing Retsudo once and for all. Retsudo, on the other hand, is under a lot of pressure from the Shogunate to slay Itto and be done with it. Otherwise, they’ll declare him a public enemy, thus allowing everybody and their mother to take a crack at him, which will also be a sort of insult to the Yagyu clan. Desperate, Retsudo sends first his daughter, Kaori, and then his bastard son, Hyoei, to take care of our heroes. Hyoei is both a swordsman and a magician, having been brought up in the mountains by an obscure, less honorable clan. Hyoei, however, has other plans in store once he kills Itto.

The big elephant in the room is the finale, which doesn’t quite tidy up things the way a lot of people wanted. However, on the same token, Ogami has still essentially won the battle, even if he hasn’t cleared his name and redeemed his clan. After all, Retsudo Yagyu has basically had his entire clan slaughtered (I can’t imagine anyone joining him after the massacres that are the finales to this and part 4), has lost all of his children*, and will lose his reputation and be disgraced once Itto is declared public enemy. In other words, Ogami has transformed Retsudo into exactly what he himself is.

This is the only movie where the supernatural comes into play, in the form of three pseudo-zombie-ghost warriors from Hyoei’s clan. In one of the film’s most memorable scenes, which clearly feels like a horror film, Itto and Daigoro go to the inn to spend the evening. When the innkeeper’s wife/daughter knocks on the door to offer them dinner, he opens the door, only for the girl to be dead with an arrow sticking out of her neck. Ogami and his son discover that the entire inn has become a bloodbath, with everybody inside having been slaughtered, but done so swiftly and quietly that even someone with acute senses and intuition like Ogami failed to notice. It’s a beautifully-filmed, if graphically violent, scene.

The only thing in the movie I didn't like was the (almost) obligatory rape sequence, which felt even more random than the others in the series, despite the fact that involves one important character. I mean, I don't like rape scenes in general, but this one felt particularly WTF to me. The woman in involved happens to be the rapist's sister, and she was introduced as being someone important, but before she can make any contribution to the story at all, her brother rapes her, both of them are killed, and that's that. It really felt incongruous to the rest of the story.

*- The movie states that Itto had killed Gunbei, who showed up in part 4, but I thought he was still alive. At the end of Part 4, we see him declaring that he wants to be the one to kill Ogami…or was that a foreshadowing to Hyoei that I missed?

_________________
I wrote a book!


Fri Apr 28, 2017 3:10 pm
Profile YIM WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 46 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  

Forum hosting by ProphpBB | Software by phpBB | Report Abuse | Privacy